Josephine's Personnel Services, Inc.

How to Prepare for Employee Performance Reviews

May 16th, 2017

Does your company offer regular performance reviews for your team members? Not all companies do, and while they take time, reviews offer a real benefit to both your organization and your employees. How can you prepare for them and offer a positive, productive experience? Read on for details.

Here’s why performance reviews matter.

Preparing for an Employee Review: As an Employer

  • Properly Prepare Yourself: Sometimes managers delay giving regular feedbackto their team members because they are unsure how to start the process or hold a formal review. The best way to prepare yourself is to determine your objective for the evaluation. Is it a regular annual review, or are you assessing the success of a big project? Focus on these areas: how does the employee communicate with other workers and supervisors, are they completing basic job duties and can they be more accountable in the future?
  • Let Employees do the Talking: Are you taking up most of the conversation, or are you letting your workers do the talking during performance reviews? Have your team member fill out a self-review form before the review, so you can see how they choose to evaluate themselves. This can illuminate areas that need improvement, and make them feel more engaged and in control of the process.
  • Give Employees Clear Guidance: Use performance reviews as an opportunity to give your employees additional guidance and support by using the evaluation to provide constructive criticism. Make sure your expectations are clear; workers who are given explicit instructions are more likely to produce quality work and stay engaged.

Read the rest of this entry »

5 Tips for Writing a Social Media Policy

November 10th, 2015

If you’re looking for ways to protect your company’s reputation online, drafting a social media policy to include in your employee handbook is a good tactic. There are many ways improper social media use can tarnish your brand’s image, but disgruntled employees are one of the most common. Here are five tips for writing a comprehensive social media policy to set reasonable restrictions on your teams’ use of the Internet.

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5 Tips for Writing a Social Media Policy

  1. Read Other Industry Policies

If you’re unsure where to start when drafting a social media policy, an easy way to get on track is to look at other company’s documents. This will help you determine language, set guidelines and figure out what you can mandate, within reason. Read the rest of this entry »

Fostering Employee Engagement in Your Company: 4 Tips

January 27th, 2015

Do your employees come to work because they have to, or do they seem interested to be there? Engaged employees see their workplace as more than a place to sit for 8+ hours a day: They see their workplace as an area to communicate and foster relationships. There are many ways to push employee engagement without monetary incentives. Here are 4 tips for encouraging your employees to be more engaged in their work.

Photo Courtesy of: MSLGROUP Global

Photo Courtesy of: MSLGROUP Global

Encouraging Employee Engagement: 4 Tips         

  1. Strategize

Fostering engagement of employees should be part of your business’ management strategy. Focus on finding quality, interested employees and then work on creating an environment that is positive and productive. Engaging your employees is an ongoing process and you should continually revamp your strategy to keep up to date and people-friendly. Read the rest of this entry »

Staffing Agency vs. Career Site: 3 Myths Debunked

April 1st, 2014

As a staffing agency, we understand what it’s like to be frustrated when it comes to applying for jobs. The continuous cycle of selling yourself on different career sites and hardly ever hearing back is not an encouraging process. Unfortunately, many people give in to the popular myths about working with a staffing agency and shy away from help, leading them to a career site that doesn’t quite deliver. Here are three of the most popular myths about staffing solutions, followed by the proper debunking of such tales.

Are you using the right resources to find a job?

Are you using the right resources to find a job?

Myth #1: A staffing agency does not provide “real” jobs. 

Here at Josephine’s Professional Staffing, we provide opportunities in many different fields including administrative, accounting/finance, engineering and more.

These are not all temporary jobs either. Our clients have developed budgets which allow for a certain number of full-time employees per year, and we get you into their field of vision. If you begin working for them on a temporary basis and a new job opens up, you are in prime position to snag it.

Myth #2: A staffing agency only provides low-paying jobs. 

Actually, it’s the complete opposite! If you have experience, are educated and have the attitude and personality that a client is looking for, you will be offered a job that compliments your caliber of work. It is more common in a career site to find only entry-level jobs or positions that are way outside of your experience, leaving you frustrated and discouraged.

Myth #3: A staffing agency is only looking for entry-level candidates. 

So many companies are now looking to staffing agencies to bring them high-level candidates who are experienced and specialized in a field. If you are looking to get your foot in the door at a high-end company, using a staffing agency (and not a career site) will put you in prime position to be hired.

It is possible to obtain the dream job you’ve been looking for, and it’s a much faster (and straighter) path with the help of a staffing agency instead of a career site. We would love to help you get started on your journey!

About Josephine’s Professional Staffing

Founded in 1988, Josephine’s Professional Staffing has nearly 25 years of business success and is continuously committed to providing superior quality staffing solutions to companies in the Bay Area. We proactively and consistently search for avenues to provide staffing solutions in the field of administrative, accounting, healthcare, light industrial, technical and professional services while taking pride in each of our employees. Josephine’s Professional Staffing is a Certified Small Business Enterprise (SBE), Underutilized Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (UDBE), and Minority Woman-Owned Business Enterprise (MWOBE). We can be reached at jps@jps-inc.com or 408.943.0111 and are located at 2158 Ringwood Avenue, San Jose, CA 95131

Photo Credit: Intel Free Press

Hiring Managers – 8 Secrets They All Know (Part 2)

September 10th, 2013
Do you know the secrets of your hiring managers?

Do you know the secrets of your hiring managers?

In part one of our two post series; we introduced the first 4 secrets that most hiring managers have been keeping to themselves. With the anxiety surrounding job interviews being so high, interactions with hiring managers can be intimidating to say the least; but what about  after the interview? Today, we delve deeper and will uncover the final 4 secrets that all hiring managers keep from employment applicants.

5. They underestimate time constraints: The time it takes to fill a position can vary, but in many cases, the hiring manager will expect a position to be filled long before the actual process will allow. Be sure to keep this in mind in the days or weeks following your initial interview.

6. Rejections letters are meant to be vague and lacking in detail: No one enjoys receiving a rejection letter, but remember that their lack of detail is intentional and that any real or honest explanation pertaining to why you were not offered a position will likely never happen. In fact, it is likely that the letter you receive is a drafted form letter sent out to the entire group of applicants.

7. They know the real meaning of “we will keep it on file:” Legally, companies must keep your application on file for a certain period of time, but it is increasingly rare for those files to be accessed for future opportunities. Keep this in mind when looking  openings later down the line.

8. They know that, “We will call you,” might mean that you’ll never hear from them: We all hope that when we hear a hiring manager say, “We will call you,” it actually means that they will call us, but it is important to understand that when those four words are spoken, we may or may not ever hear from that company again. 

The secrets uncovered throughout this blog  series are only a few that may be forever kept in silence by hiring managers; and while the idea of being kept in the dark is less than reassuring, the success or failure of an interview will always lie in the preparation. Be sure to check back in the coming weeks for tips, tricks and insider methods for ensuring success in your next interview!

About Josephine’s Professional Staffing

Founded in 1988, Josephine’s Professional Staffing has nearly 25 years of business success and is continuously committed to providing superior quality staffing solutions to companies in the Bay Area. We proactively and consistently search for avenues to provide staffing solutions in the field of administrative, accounting, healthcare, light industrial, technical and professional services while taking pride in each of our employees. Josephine’s Professional Staffing is a Certified Small Business Enterprise (SBE), Underutilized Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (UDBE), and Minority Woman-Owned Business Enterprise (MWOBE). We can be reached at jps@jps-inc.com or 4008.943.0111 and are located at 2158 Ringwood Avenue, San Jose, CA 95131.

Photo Credit: bpsusf

Hiring Managers – 8 Secrets They All Know (Part 1)

September 3rd, 2013
Do you know the secrets?

Do you know the secrets?

Whether you are a seasoned professional or breaking into the business of your choice, interactions with hiring managers are intimidating and nerve wracking to say the least. We have all experienced an interview that left us with an urge for more information. In this two part blog post series, we will uncover eight secrets that hiring managers generally don’t share with employment applicants. Here are the first four:

1. Most interviewers are nervous too: This may not be the juiciest of secrets, but it is true that most interviewers have a case of the butterflies before walking into a candidate’s interview. It is also not unusual that many hiring managers consider themselves to be somewhat unskilled when it comes to conducting an interview.

2. They want you to let your guard down: Hiring managers are being intentionally kind and exceedingly friendly throughout your interview in hopes that you will become a more candid applicant, allowing them to get a better depiction of who you are as an individual and how you   might contribute to their company culture if offered employment.

3. If you don’t fit in, it will matter: You could be the most qualified candidate for a position, but if you do not fit into the company culture or identify with the general mindset of the current employees, the hiring manager may pass on offering you employment. Keep this in mind when applying for positions and be sure to only apply to companies in which you would enjoy working for.

4. The courtesy you give your current employer is a green light or red flag:  Hiring managers look at a multitude of details when speaking with applicants; this includes how they interact with others when the conversation is related to their current place of employment. When a manager asks when you could start at their company if hired, a candidate that gives a date prior to the appropriate two weeks’ notice could in fact put up a huge red flag for that manager. You may ask, “Why?” Well, regardless of your personal feelings towards your current employer, a lack of professional courtesy could be a foreshadowing of how a hiring manager would see you treating their company in the future. With this in mind, keep all discussions concerning your current employment positive and professional.

These four secrets are only the tip of the hiring manager’s secret iceberg. Be sure to check back next week as we uncover four more secrets and give even more insight into the mind of your next potential interviewer.

About Josephine’s Professional Staffing

Founded in 1988, Josephine’s Professional Staffing has nearly 25 years of business success and is continuously committed to providing superior quality staffing solutions to companies in the Bay Area. We proactively and consistently search for avenues to provide staffing solutions in the field of administrative, accounting, healthcare, light industrial, technical and professional services while taking pride in each of our employees. Josephine’s Professional Staffing is a Certified Small Business Enterprise (SBE), Underutilized Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (UDBE), and Minority Woman-Owned Business Enterprise (MWOBE). We can be reached at jps@jps-inc.com or 4008.943.0111 and are located at 2158 Ringwood Avenue, San Jose, CA 95131.

Photo Credit: USDAgov

Hiring a Staffing Agency – Benefits for Companies

March 5th, 2013
Certified as Small Business and Minority Woman Owned since 1988

Certified as Small Business and Minority Woman Owned since 1988

Finding the right employee can be difficult task, especially when companies don’t have the available time or resources. There are three core reasons why using a staffing agency is a far better choice for your organization.

  1. It Saves Time – By using a staffing agency, companies don’t have to spend hours upon hours sorting through hundreds of resumes and scheduling endless interviews with candidates.Put your mind at ease with JPS; we conduct extensive background checks and have customized screening, recruiting, orientation and performance evaluation processes to find the right employee and make the most of your time.
  2. It’s Cost-Effective – Hiring the wrong employee can cost companies time, money and resources they may not have available. Rely on the expertise of a staffing agency to find the right fit the first time around. Plus,  Read the rest of this entry »

Office Gifts for Employees

November 29th, 2012

Office Gifts for Employees

In our previous post, we talked about handling holiday bonuses and your employees. So what if your company cannot afford to give out any holiday bonuses? You still want your employees to feel valued and appreciated. A great way to get that point across is to first speak with them ahead of time and explain the situation, and to get them a little something for their efforts throughout the year.

But what is appropriate to give to your employees as a holiday present? Here are some definite do’s as well as some ideas to get you started on the right track for office gifting this holiday season. Read the rest of this entry »

Summer Help Heading Out the Door? How to Use Temporary Support to Finish Any Open Summer Projects

August 11th, 2011

Summertime, and the living is easy. Unless you are in charge of keeping critical projects running on schedule but are losing employees to their summer vacations.

Most employees take their extended vacations during the months of June – September in order to enjoy the summer with family and friends. School schedules and great weather make this time of year perfect for taking holidays — which means managers must often scramble to coordinate vacations in an effort to avoid a backlog of incomplete work.

To help cover for your colleagues during their time off, why not bring in temporary staff? We’re not talking about inexperienced college interns or your boss’s favorite nephew. There are three great places to find skilled talent that can help you on a temporary basis.

First, consider former employees who left on good terms, whether through retirement or taking a job at another company. They might be able – even glad – to put in some freelance hours for you. Their knowledge of your clients, your company culture and your methodologies will allow them to make immediate contributions.

Second, take a look at the pool of job candidates that were previously rejected for the incumbent’s position. Often, those individuals were qualified but lost the position to someone even more skilled. Their qualifications might allow them to help you now, and they might be glad to get some extra work experience and pay.

A third good source is a staffing firm that specializes in employees with the skills you need. A good agency will have long-term relationships with employees and can ensure they have the necessary technical skills and knowledge. If you want more than a warm body to fill a seat and do busy work, use an agency that will give you skilled, experienced employees. If you’re hiring them for only a few weeks, they need to hit the ground running, so you’ll want temps you won’t need to train.

The key to successful use of independent contractors or temporary employees lies in planning what type of help you will need, how much, and when. Having the right people in place, wherever they came from, will help you keep your sanity while keeping your company afloat during the vacation-heavy summer months.

5 Non-Traditional Interview Questions That Can Help You Select the Right Candidate

July 21st, 2011

Selecting the right candidate for a job opening can be tricky, especially if there are several great candidates available, yet choosing the right person for a job is critical to your company’s success. While there are no guarantees that the candidate who looks so good on paper will be as good of an employee in real life, try using non-traditional job interview questions to help bring out the answers that will help you assess your candidates on a different level.

Candidates often worry about non-traditional interview questions, which can seem like their only purpose is to put someone on the spot or trick them. But there is a method to their madness. Here are 5 non-traditional interview questions and the reasons behind asking them.

  • “Where do you see yourself in five years? This is an icebreaker question that allows the interviewer to get a peek at the candidate’s true intentions. Use this question to find out what the candidate is seeking and if their expectations match the actual job role.
  • “Tell me about a time you were treated unfairly at work, and how was it resolved?” This question nudges most candidates outside of their comfort levels. However, those candidates who are true team players and work well with others should be able to explain how being treated “unfairly” actually provided an opportunity to take responsibility and end up with a positive outcome. Candidates who take a victim stance are not what you are looking for.
  • “What’s the most adventurous or risky thing you’ve ever done?” While this may seem like a loaded question, it’s actually a good way to identify candidates who enjoy getting the most out of life in their personal life as well as at the office. Those who lead active lives are most likely to be proactive at work.
  • “If you could be any superhero for a day, who would you be?” While this question may seem to come completely out of left field, it can help you see a clear division between great and so-so candidates. The best candidates will be able to logically explain why being a superhero would be beneficial to mankind. And the stronger the powers of the superhero, the more powerful the job candidate sees himself.
  • “What are the first three things you do at work in the morning?” This is a fun question, but it has a purpose. Since much of the workday requires planning and prioritizing, what a candidate does first thing in the morning at work is actually very important. The best candidates will generally respond by explaining the use of a calendar system to stay on top of tasks, or getting the most important things done first as a priority.

Asking non-traditional interview questions allows you to observe a few things about your candidate pool: How comfortable are they with unexpected questions – can they think on their feet and not panic? Are they creative? Can they roll with the punches and maybe have a bit of fun in a stressful situation? All of these are good qualities to have in an employee, and you might not dig deep enough to find these qualities with straightforward, traditional interview questions.