Josephine's Personnel Services, Inc.
Staffing Services
JPS, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

JPS, Inc. provides staffing services in Silicon Valley, San Jose, Santa Clara County, Northern California, Southern California, Nationwide

Make Sure Your Job Descriptions Don’t Attract the Wrong Candidates

March 29th, 2012

It’s pretty simple: if you write a bad job posting, you’ll get the wrong candidates. Or desperate candidates, or candidates who are applying for everything they see.

All online job postings attract some bad candidates, but poorly written postings attract more.   What’s a bad job posting? The ones that look like this:

”XYZ company, located in Washington DC, is the foremost widget maker in the region.  We are seeking a Controller.  Responsibilities include… blah blah blah.”

That posting is dull and gives you the minimal, most dry information about the company and the job. If you want to attract good candidates, you have to… well, attract them!

How?

When you write your job posting, here are the things you’ll want to include:

  1. Context.  Imagine you’re trying to answer the key context questions that a good candidate will ask about a new opportunity.  For example, if you are hiring a controller, answer questions in the posting, before they can be asked, such as:
  • what position do I report to?
  • how many people report to me?
  • what are the annual revenues?
  • are you profitable?

Candidates for different positions would ask different key context questions. What you’re trying to do here is begin a conversation by engaging the other person.

2. Expectations.  Your posting should describe what success looks like, or what tangible business accomplishments are expected. For example, instead of saying, “this job will help raise funds,” say “this person will be challenged to help generate $1 million dollars that will be used for specific programs.” The reason you’re hiring someone is to get business results.  So why not list the results you want, right in the post? It never hurts to let people know what you expect.

3. Communication.  Paint a clear mental picture of the possibilities you’re offering, such as what it’s like to work at your company. Or talk about a day in the life of this position. The reader should get a clear idea of whatever value you’re highlighting, whether it’s the great staff, a tangible chance for success, recognition or a fun work environment. So, instead of “we offer a flexible work environment,” describe the 40-hour work week that can start at 6 a.m. or finish at 10 p.m. — whatever works best for the applicant.

4. Meaningful words.  In other words, don’t use hackneyed, stale, old meaningless phrases thrown into virtually every posting. These words are so overused, they’ve lost their meaning:

  • dynamic
  • hands on
  • motivated
  • fast paced
  • exciting
  • team player
  • self-starter

The words you use and the information you share in your job postings make a huge difference in the quality of the candidates you attract. Like to know more? Contact Josephine’s Professional Staffing today!

 

Keep The Good Ones! Management Strategies To Retain And Develop Your Highest Potential Employees

March 15th, 2012

First, let’s define what constitutes a high potential employee.  Generally, they are regarded as the top 3 to 5% of a company, who demonstrate high levels of contribution. And while every organization may have its own addendums to that definition, there is consensus that this group is always in hot demand.

Competitors may be trying to recruit your best managers right now. And research shows that top performing managers are leaving their jobs, even in today’s unstable employment environment.

So why do many companies invest a lot of effort into recruiting these employees, but then do very little by way of talent management and talent development to retain them?

At a time when retaining good talent is so crucial, organizations must make sure they have employee retention and development strategies in place to avoid turnover. Below are 6 different ideas to try.

1. Mentoring.  Corporate environments have started implementing more structured mentoring programs. These can be very powerful for acclimating employees to the corporate culture and values. Mentoring can also be enormously valuable for those high potential employees who thrive on interaction with influential colleagues.

2. High visibility assignments. It’s important that these employees be given challenging opportunities that are outside their comfort zones and keep them highly engaged. You may also want to explore other options such as rotation to a supplier or partner, swapping positions, coaching/mentoring, or other creative talent development solutions that expand a high potential employee’s visibility and depth of experience.

3. Open communication. This may be stating the obvious, but if a high potential employee has a concern or an idea, it’s in your organization’s best interest to listen. You may also want to let them know that you believe they’re high potential, and therefore valuable to the organization. Just don’t make it public about who’s a rising star or you’ll create a culture of winners and losers.

4. Learning and development. Think about other types of learning and employee development opportunities that you could offer, beyond certifications or employee training programs.  Many organizations are coming up with talent management structures that allow one employee to experience many facets of the organization, from sales to marketing to customer service.

5. Measure progress quarterly. Companies measure themselves on a quarterly basis, so do the same with your employees. Especially if you’re exposing high potential employees to mentors, new and high visibility projects, position swapping, etc., and putting them in unfamiliar territory, a proactive quarterly review provides them with more immediate feedback.

6. Alignment.  Align your top performers’ development plans with your company’s strategy so what they do supports the organization’s needs as well as their own.  Determine the best pace for their career development. Give them the time needed to plan their projects, implement them and stay to see the results so they (and you) can evaluate their performance.

 

Don’t Get Fired! How to Become a Valuable Employee

March 8th, 2012

Have you ever stopped to consider that you might lose your job in the next layoff or downsizing at your company? Would it be easy to replace you with someone else who can do your job for less money?  If you answered that last question with a definite YES, then you need to think about how to increase your value to your employer. Here are ten tips:

  1. Expand your company knowledge. Become the go-to guy for questions and solutions.  Be the one who knows how things work.  In other words, make yourself into an important resource for your fellow employees and even your boss.
  2. Expand your personal knowledge. Take classes in anything that will improve your job skills. By rounding out your talents and expanding them, you’ll automatically become a more valuable employee.
  3. Be a team player. Promote team unity.  Support your coworkers in any way possible.  In doing so you will become known as someone who can work with anyone. You’ll prove that you’re adaptable and have excellent social skills.
  4. Seek out more responsibility. You don’t want to fly under the radar. You want to be on the radar and coming through loud and clear, so ask your supervisor for more responsibilities. Work late, come in early or do whatever it takes to be known as a productive, hard worker.
  5. Be a positive force. Don’t be the type of coworker who is always pointing out mistakes or why things won’t work. Be the one who says it can be done, and work hard to ensure it happens.
  6. Find ways to increase profits/cut costs. Everything in the business world ultimately comes down to bottom line profitability.  Watch for ways to cut costs or make systems more efficient and present solutions to your superior, complete with a plan. For example, show how to replace copy paper with a less expensive version, or how to schedule warehouse workers more effectively to avoid unnecessary overtime.
  7. Be adaptable to change.  Change is inevitable, and those who can roll with it will survive.  Those who complain, cannot or will not adapt, or generally slow the process, will not.
  8. Be a problem solver. Every workplace has problems. Be the one who comes up with effective solutions and can put them into action. Problem solvers have inherent value and retention appeal.
  9. Mind your manners. You will be well liked and respected by everyone for simply acting respectful to your boss and coworkers.
  10. Get cracking. Don’t wait.  Begin increasing your value as a team member, mentor, leader, problem-solver, cheerleader, learned man or money saver immediately!  The sooner you start the quicker your employer will see you as someone they want and need to retain for the long run.

Anytime you need great advice on the job market or help finding a new job, contact Josephine’s Professional Staffing, Inc, a leading staffing provider in Silicon Valley since 1988.

 

Reference Checks Aren’t Just A Formality! 4 Important Tips For Conducting Reference Checks

January 26th, 2012

Too many managers are ignoring the importance of getting good reference checks on candidates, either not doing them at all or not doing a thorough job. The most common excuses?

  • The candidate only provides referees who will give them a glowing report.
  • The referee has a grudge against the candidate and slants their reference in an unfairly negative manner.
  • The referee gives you a positive report, because they are afraid of the legal ramifications of saying anything bad.
  • The referee is restricted by a company policy that limits what they can say about previous employees.

Is it any wonder that checking references has attained a reputation of being a waste of time?

Avoiding the Problems

Problem 1: The candidate only provides referees who will give them a glowing report.

Solution: Ask for extra references beyond those supplied on the resume and see if anyone else from the company can verify the information you collected during the interview. These extra people may still give a positively slanted opinion, but it’s harder for them to slant true facts. And, when referee statements are cross-referenced (see below), any holes that exist will show up.

Problem 2: The referee has a grudge against the candidate and slants their reference in an unfairly negative manner.

Solution: Once again, do at least two reference checks per employer. If one of the two is not so good, do a third one as a cross-reference against the other two. If two out of three are good, the bad one can probably be put into the category of a “suspect reference”.

Problem 3: The referee gives you a positive report because they are afraid of the legal ramifications of saying anything bad.

Solution: It’s vital that you get accurate information. If the referee you are talking to is one of those people who is afraid of saying the wrong thing, you’ll find they are far more comfortable simply confirming facts and figures. They will only become hesitant when asked something that invites their opinion.

Problem 4: The referee is restricted by their company policy that limits what they can say about previous employees.

Solution: This situation will be at least partly resolved when the emphasis is placed on the previous employee’s actual results on the job.

Companies that have such restrictive policies generally don’t mind verifying production statistics, or confirming what positions the employee held and what functions they performed. You can generally get more information, however, by digging deeper on the functional aspects. For example, “So, he was involved with collecting outstanding debts. Did the amount of outstanding debts decrease while he held the job?”

The reference check is, by no means, the main deciding factor. But if it’s done right, it can contribute powerful data to the decision process.

Quirky, Laid Back or Too “Buddy Buddy”? How To Successfully Handle Different Types Of Interviewers

January 19th, 2012

So much job search advice is based on the assumption that all interviewers are exactly the same. But how could that possibly be the case? The interviewer’s personality and interview style both play bigger roles in determining the outcome of an interview than you might think.

Preparing for an interview means more than researching the company and practicing your answers to common questions. You’ll also want to get yourself ready to face any kind of interviewer! Read on to familiarize yourself with some common interviewer archetypes and some effective strategies for dealing with each of them.

1) The Chatty Cathy You might feel relieved if you find yourself facing a friendly, gregarious interviewer, but be careful not to let your guard down and be too overfamiliar or unprofessional. Respond with warmth and friendliness, as the chatty type will appreciate it, and engage actively but professionally in the conversation when and if you are asked a question.

2) The Interrogator This type of interviewer of the type may seem to be better suited to a career with the FBI. They tend to fire questions off rapidly, often in an intimidating tone or manner. Just keep your cool — this type may be trying to see if you’re easily flustered. Try to slow down the pace of the interview by taking the time to think about your responses and answering calmly. Remain pleasant, but don’t be sociable.

3) The By-The-Books Interviewer This type tries to stick as closely as possible to a preexisting interview script, either to keep things as objective as possible, or because of a level of discomfort with the entire interviewing process. Respect this style by sticking to the pace they set. Don’t go off on tangents or ask too many questions that will break out of the interviewer’s comfort zone and leave a bad impression.

4) The Inexperienced or (Ill-Prepared) One When you go into an interview, you assume the person you’ll be speaking to will be professional and experienced, but that might not always be the case. Whether the interviewer is new to the company or simply new to the hiring process, blatant inexperience can throw you off if you’re not prepared.  Just stick to your planned talking points and maintain an air of calm, poised professionalism. However, if the interviewer is repeatedly unable to answer your questions, you may want to find out later if there is anyone else with whom you could schedule a discussion or tour.

5) The Nosy Ned or Nancy There are some interviewers out there who will step over the line of what’s appropriate when meeting with potential hires. If an interviewer asks you questions that you feel are inappropriate or make you uncomfortable in any way, first try a gentle redirect, stating that you’d prefer to stick to standard work-related topics. If the interviewer persists with this line of questioning, conclude the interview and leave.

Although it’s unlikely that you will encounter an interviewer who absolutely embodies one of these five types, it’s helpful if you can determine which type of interviewer you have, then take steps to adjust your approach to the interview.

If you’d like more advice on how to handle tricky interview situations and other pitfalls of the job search, why not consider joining JPS, Inc? Contact us today!

Overqualified Candidates? Do Not Fear! Overcome Your Reluctance to Hire Them

January 12th, 2012

In the pre-recession days, the prevailing wisdom was to avoid hiring overqualified applicants. Hiring managers assumed they would easily become bored, lose motivation and would either underperform or leave.

But recent research shows that people who were thought to be overqualified actually performed better at their jobs. It has also shown that people rarely leave a job because they feel they’re too talented for it. People stay or leave because of working conditions, such as interpersonal conflict.

Hiring managers are soon going to be faced with an influx of highly qualified employees, as the job market inches toward recovery. Instead of disqualifying “overqualified” candidates immediately, you might be better off reconsidering your old attitude. Next time you’re looking at a stack of impressive resumes, here are a few things to consider:

Look to the Future

When making hiring decisions, don’t just focus on your current needs, but on your future needs. You never know when you might need someone to move up in the organization, and if you have qualified talent already on your payroll, it will save you a lot of time and money.

Consider Flexibility

If a person has skills that are applicable to other areas of your company, you can give them opportunities to use those skills not only for the job they were hired to do, but also in the company at large. Allowing an “overqualified” employee to use their broader skill set doesn’t just benefit the company, it also engages that person and sends the message that you value them and their experience.

Extra Motivation

“Overqualified” candidates often inject a new energy into a group by inspiring your existing team to “up their game.” They can also bridge the gap between junior and senior-level staff, allowing expertise to come from the team, not management.

More Value

When it comes to overqualified candidates, you often get more than you pay for. There’s no need to overpay, but you may have to pay at the high end of the range—knowing you’re likely to get more bang for your buck.

Bring Them On Carefully

One caveat about hiring the overqualified: Effective interviewing and onboarding are essential. Put all the cards on the table during the interview: ask the candidates directly about how they’ll handle their overqualification for the job. Ask them to convince you why they want the job and try to gauge whether they want the position for the right reasons. If you decide to hire them, set clear expectations as to where and how this person will fit into the organization—set specific job parameters.

The next time a resume from an overqualified candidate comes across your desk, don’t discard it automatically. By adjusting your perspective, you just might find that hiring an overqualified candidate is the best decision you could have made.

Does Your Company Culture Stand Out from the Pack? How to Attract “Top Dog” Candidates

November 23rd, 2011

How can you keep your organization competitive in the drive for top employees? It can be hard for organizations to really stand out from their competitors. But with company culture becoming an important factor in career decisions, it’s time to look at your organization and see how yours compares.

Why do companies as disparate as Google, Southwest Airlines and Zappo’s get such great reviews from their employees? Why do they attract so many candidates, and so many good ones? Easy. They’ve developed company cultures that epitomize strong values, a modern work ethic that includes fun and service to both their customers and their communities.

These top companies know what good employees are looking for, and they make sure to publicize what sets them apart from the competition.

If you want to appeal to the top-drawer candidates that apply to these popular companies in droves, it’s time to think about what your company can offer. Has your company defined its core values? Created a distinct corporate culture? Have you expressed these values on your web site or in your job listings, where candidates can see them?

For example, Google promotes its “all for one and one for all” corporate mentality on its website, by mentioning how “at lunchtime, almost everyone eats in the office café, sitting at whatever table has an opening and enjoying conversations with Googlers from different teams.” This includes the founders and other upper-level executives. They also create an open work environment, with very few solo offices and a generous supply of laptops to allow for mobile coding, anytime email and note taking. They offer plenty of opportunities for exercise and comfort: providing bicycles or scooters to help staffers travel between meetings, massage chairs, large inflatable balls, game rooms and gyms. They even encourage socializing by sponsoring employee groups for different interests, such as meditation, movies, wine tasting and salsa dancing.

Southwest Airlines has long understood how employee satisfaction and environmental awareness go hand in hand. They also know that their employees like to feel like contributing members of society, especially in their home community. That’s why they promote their Charitable Giving and Community Outreach programs. They started Community Giving Boards that have been trained to evaluate charitable giving requests from their local community. The Boards are made up of local employees from various work groups who evaluate the donation requests and donate complimentary, round trip tickets to approved organizations for fundraising or transportation purposes. They also sustain a relationship with Ronald McDonald House Charities so they can aid in the transportation needs of families facing serious illnesses and administers their own Medical Transportation Grant Program in conjunction with hospitals and organizations that assist individuals who must travel to receive medical care.

Last but far from least is Zappo’s, a company that makes sure you know they’re about much more than shoes.  They have an entire page on their site devoted to their Family Core values. These include:

  1. Deliver WOW Through Service
  2. Embrace and Drive Change
  3. Be Adventurous, Creative, and Open-Minded
  4. Pursue Growth and Learning
  5. Build a Positive Team and Family Spirit
  6. Do More With Less
  7. Be Passionate and Determined

They make it very clear that they expect employees to be innovative, to go above and beyond, to embrace teamwork and to have fun while doing so. They are proud of their unique corporate culture and openly share it through their web site, blogging, videos and more.

If you want to attract great candidates, you have to be a great company to work for. Not every company can be just like Google, Southwest or Zappo’s, but you can certainly take tips from them on how to create a corporate environment that excellent people will want to work in.

Find Good Help for the Holidays: How Can Temporary Staffing Help Keep You Running Smoothly This Season?

November 17th, 2011

If you didn’t include holiday hiring plans in your yearly projections, it’s not too late! While there tends to be a mad rush to begin seasonal hiring once the leaves start to change, many employers are still recruiting for candidates deep into the snowy underbrush of the winter holiday season:

  • Thirty-three percent of employers who are hiring seasonal staff reported they are still trying to fill open positions in November.
  • Eleven percent said they may still be looking as late as December.

There are various functional areas where companies need help the most during the holiday rush. Across all industries, popular areas for recruitment this holiday season include:

  • Customer Service – 30 percent
  • Administrative/Clerical support – 16 percent
  • Shipping/Delivery – 15 percent
  • Technology – 12 percent
  • Inventory management – 10 percent
  • Non-retail sales – 9 percent
  • Accounting/Finance – 8 percent
  • Marketing – 8 percent

Have you given any thought to how many people you’ll need, and where?

Think specifically about your recruiting and hiring needs. How flexible will these temporary employees need to be? Will they have regular shifts, or will they need to be available on an as-needed basis?  Be sure to mention this in your job description or any other communications you send out, so potential seasonal employees will know what you expect. Students, homemakers, retirees and other people who are often drawn to seasonal help positions will appreciate knowing what they can fit into their schedules.

Where Can You Find the People You Need?

The fastest and easiest way is to use a qualified temporary staffing agency. If you don’t already have a strong relationship with a staffing agency in your area, contact colleagues and other professionals with whom you network to get references or recommendations. Try to find an agency that specializes in your industry. They can quickly provide prescreened candidates with the experience and flexibility that you need. Make sure you ask questions about their ability to meet your employment needs. If you need to hire a large number of employees for seasonal employment, for example, ensure the agency has the necessary resources and expertise to fulfill your order.

The staffing agency can also weed out the undesirable candidates who aren’t worth your time and money, even on a temporary basis. These would include:

  • Someone who is unwilling to work certain hours
  • Someone who isn’t enthusiastic
  • Someone who knows nothing about your company/products

Your agency will send you people who are knowledgeable about your expectations, your needs, your company, and what you do.

Finally, if you are one of the 30 percent of employers who often transition some seasonal workers into full-time, permanent staff, this is a great way to evaluate potential employees. The assignment has a finite end, so if you don’t think the person would work out full time, it’s easy to shake hands at the end of the assignment and wish them well. If you do want to hire one of your seasonal employees, you may have gotten their new year off to a great start with your offer!

Crank It Up, Grads! How Recent Graduates Can Rev Up Their Job Search and Finally Find Employment

November 10th, 2011

Despite the high unemployment rate, college grads can find jobs in this job market — after all, business is still going on. Opportunities do exist, but today’s college graduates may have to take a different approach to accommodate the drastic changes in the job market, like a longer hiring process and greater competition.

Getting a post-college job in this economy requires a new way of thinking about the job search and looking for work. Here are a half dozen ways to get yourself ready and get a job.

  1. Organize Yourself If your parents are your main source of job hunt guidance, consider how much job searching conventions have changed significantly in the last decade. Unless your parents have also had to find new employment in the past few years, you’ll want to seek more current advice.
  2. Sell Yourself Make sure your resume doesn’t look like a student’s.  Instead of submitting a resume where the first half of the page is taken up by education, notes on coursework, and honors, play up work experience—internships, volunteer work, and so forth. When a hiring manager makes an initial scan of your resume, you want her to see skills and experience she can use, not a list of college courses.
  3. Think Broadly Don’t limit your job search into too narrow a slot. If you’re interested in a particular field, think of all the jobs related or even vaguely related to that field. Do a brainstorming session with friends and family, and search the Internet for even more ideas. This might double, triple, even quadruple your job prospects and your internship possibilities — and may even change the way you were thinking about your future career.
  4. Act Globally If you can’t find a job in the United States, consider working abroad. First, it shows initiative, a willingness to learn and adaptability and desire for personal growth. It also will give you a breadth of experience and an edge that other grads won’t have. In today’s world of increasingly globalized activities, being cognizant of other cultural differences and proving that you can operate efficiently in them is a major plus. If you have language and managerial skills that go across countries, you can only help those businesses looking to expand markets in other countries, as most businesses are doing today.
  5. Be Productive  If you can’t get a paying gig, take an unpaid internship or volunteer. It’s important to show employers that you know how to use time productively. You don’t want to give employers the image of a college grad hanging out at home or doing odd jobs. You should strive to appear to be progressing and challenging yourself at all times, even if it’s not in a conventional position of employment.
  6. Get Help  Use your college’s career office. You may think campus resources are only for current students, but many campuses’ career offices cater specifically to grads. Ask them to connect you with alumni who work in the field you’re interested in.

 

Avoid the Job Hoppers! Don’t Waste Your Time Hiring Someone Who Will Quit in Months

November 3rd, 2011

One of the most daunting prospects in this marketplace is trying to determine which candidates really want to work for your organization and which candidates are just looking for any job they can find until this recession blows over. Most applicants are savvy enough to give you all the right answers during an interview, to make you think you’ve found the right fit for your company. Employers and recruiters have to be diligent when it comes to ensuring the candidates actions will match their words.

So, what’s the definition of a job hopper?

It’s kind of like that famous saying about art, “you know it when you see it.”  If a candidate is 30 and has had 6 jobs since college, he’s probably a job hopper. Job hoppers don’t have staying power.  They’re in it more for themselves and their immediate needs, rather than for a career or for your company.  Quitting 1-2 jobs early when you’re young is acceptable.  At that age, people are exploring life and work options.  But 6 times is a pattern. Job hoppers might perform well while they’re there, but in the end they’re just not likely to stick around.

Consider implementing the following tips during the interview process to help filter out potential job hoppers.

  1. Ask Them to Talk About Future Goals One of the best interviewing tactics to identify candidates that might be “settling” for a position is to ask for details about their future goals. By learning more about what a candidate hopes to accomplish one, three or even five years down the line, you’ll be able to get a grasp on whether their desires are realistic at your company or in the role they’ve applied for.
  2. Ask Them For Letters Of Recommendation By asking for multiple letters of recommendation and by requesting that those letters address “why this is a good potential job for the candidate,” you might gather some more data. If the letters aren’t consistent with the candidate’s own statements, you might have spotted someone who is “settling.”
  3. Consider Running Credit/Financial Checks While there is some debate in the HR community about whether credit checks are helpful or an invasion of privacy, you can see whether the candidate is under significant financial stress and may be taking your job just for the money, or has a spotty history of paying bills. Someone with a strong, stable work history shouldn’t have a poor credit record.

The recession has caused a lot of great employees to lose their jobs, so there are a lot of highly qualified people who will be thrilled to be a productive employee at your company. By taking the necessary steps to separate these high quality candidates from the ones that are looking for “any offer,” you can ensure that your company avoids future job hoppers and comes out of this recovery stronger than before.